A Treatise on the Brewing of Beer

A Treatise on the Brewing of Beer

Product Description

It’s Theory And Practice – a Maltster’s Classic from 1796 – a detailed and comprehensive discussion on the selection of malts and hops, the cleaning of equipment and barrels, and finally the production and qualities of beers. “In this work will be found some profitable and necessary directions to maltsters. Improvements in the brew house, and brewing utensils. Showing the cause what makes hard and sour beer. Directions for preventing beer from become sour or foxed, even if brewed in the warmest season. Also directions in what state to cleanse the beer, so as to have it fine without using any art or device whatsoever; and for the management of the beer in the cellar. The different experiments are from twenty years practice.” -International Brewers’ Journal, Volume 34, 1898 “Before I presumed to offer this small treatise to the public, the different modes and methods, here recommended, I have proved by different experiments, which I flatter myself will be found of utility, particularly to private families, especially farmers, because their servants have very little knowledge of brewing, their time being so much employed in other business, and so frequently are they changing their employ that they are rendered incapable of being competent in brewing. I do not presume to dictate to those who are proficients; but it must be acknowledge that good malt is frequently marred in brewing by persons who have very little or no knowledge of brewing, and I flatter myself that by a perusal of this treatise it will enable them to be more competent in making the best of the malt entrusted to their care, to the greater satisfaction and benefit of their employers. Waters having a great predominance in brewing, I have given directions in the choice and improvement of them. The improvements in the brewing utensils will be attended with some expense, but the utility arising therefrom will soon make amends. “I have taken the liberty to admonish the retailer of common brewer’s beer, because, from their inattention in managing the beer after it comes into their stock or possession, the blame, if any, is imputed to the brewer but I am fully convinced to the contrary, from the almost daily practice of the common brewer, and their malt being of the first quality, as country brewers generally make their own malt, and that from the best barley, together with the convenience of their utensils, enables them to have the advantage of most private families that brew their own beer; therefore it principally depends on the conduct of the publican as to the quality of the beer, after it comes into his stock, or possession. “I have taken the liberty to give some directions in the choice of malt, not that I mean to challenge the maltster, or give him directions in the management of his corn, except in the drying. I presume if malt is not attended to on the kiln and perfectly sound dried, it never will produce good and wholesome beer.” -E. HUGHES, Sep. 3, 1796

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