Designing Great Beers: The Ultimate Guide to Brewing Classic Beer Styles

Designing Great Beers: The Ultimate Guide to Brewing Classic Beer Styles

Designing Great Beers: The Ultimate Guide to Brewing Classic Beer Styles

  • Used Book in Good Condition

Author Ray Daniels provides the formulas, tables, and information to take your brewing to the next level in this detailed technical manual.Part 1 of is a complete book in itself, focused solely on home-brewing ingredients and techniques (including three superb chapters on hops alone). Ray Daniels proves himself the “techie” type, infusing his introductory chapters with as much brewing math as brewing lore. Yet, Daniels never hops off the deep end of geekdom. Instead, he complements this emphasis on data with the creative use of graphics; where one could get bogged down in the stats, there is usually a clear visual depiction to instantly summarize their meaning. This focus on facts continues into part 2 of

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Robert M. Halperin

166 of 171 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars
The best recipe formulation book I have seen, June 26, 2002
By 
Robert M. Halperin (Broomfield, CO USA) –
(REAL NAME)
  

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This review is from: Designing Great Beers: The Ultimate Guide to Brewing Classic Beer Styles (Paperback)
First, let me say what this book is not. It is not a recipe book, or a book which describes the techniques for brewing beer. In other words, it is not for beginners.
After following recipes for a number of batches of beer, it was time to learn how to create my own recipes. The purpose of this book is to do just that; come up with your own recipes. The first part of the book tells the reader how to compute the grain bill, the hop bill and how to hit original gravity. It also contains information on beer color, yeast and water. I used this section to make the computations for my first original recipe. This, in turn, gave me the incentive to buy a brewing software package which I now use in conjunction with the second part of the book.
The second part describes beer styles and what ingredients go into each style described. There is a chart for each style which gives information on ingredients used in beers which made it to the second round of the NHC. I found some of the charts in this part somewhat confusing and there are a few references in the text to wrong charts. However, as a result of this book, I have started to formulate my own recipes with a lot of success.
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R. Danley

93 of 98 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars
I consult this book before every batch, August 12, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Designing Great Beers: The Ultimate Guide to Brewing Classic Beer Styles (Paperback)
The first section of Ray’s book covers the fundamentals of all grain brewing. I seldom refer to it.
However, the second section not only profiles many of the classic beer styles, it analyzes the recipes and techniques used in producing competition winning entries for the styles. While one can argue that strict style guidelines and competitions based on style guidelines are counterproductive in the craft beer industry, it is very interesting to see how accomplished brewers are formulating their recipes. Many of the formulation compilations are surprising. If anything, they show that you CAN deviate from strict recipe guidelines and produce a quality beer.
I have two shelves full of brewing books. This is the one I would hang onto if I was allowed only one brewing reference.
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Anonymous

62 of 64 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars
Good book, poor ebook, November 6, 2010
By 
R. Danley (Fishers, IN, USA) –

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The print version of the book is excellent. Unfortunately, when preparing the ebook, the publishers apparently used optical character recognition software, and didn’t proofread the final copy.

Many of the equations needed to determine the amounts needed in the recipes make no sense. This makes the strongest points of the book worthless. Until the equation errors are corrected, I would recommend saving your money for the print copy

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