Designing Great Beers: The Ultimate Guide to Brewing Classic Beer Styles

November 6, 2018 - Comment

Author Ray Daniels provides the brewing formulas, tables, and information to take your brewing to the next level in this detailed technical manual.Part 1 of Designing Great Beers is a complete book in itself, focused solely on home-brewing ingredients and techniques (including three superb chapters on hops alone). Ray Daniels proves himself the “techie” type,

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(as of December 12, 2018 12:55 pm GMT - Details)

Author Ray Daniels provides the brewing formulas, tables, and information to take your brewing to the next level in this detailed technical manual.Part 1 of Designing Great Beers is a complete book in itself, focused solely on home-brewing ingredients and techniques (including three superb chapters on hops alone). Ray Daniels proves himself the “techie” type, infusing his introductory chapters with as much brewing math as brewing lore. Yet, Daniels never hops off the deep end of beer geekdom. Instead, he complements this emphasis on data with the creative use of graphics; where one could get bogged down in the stats, there is usually a clear visual depiction to instantly summarize their meaning.

This focus on facts continues into part 2 of Daniels’s guide, where it backs an admirably pragmatic take on beer styles and their importance in home-brewing. Daniels devotes a chapter to each of 14 major style categories, detailing historical origins and modern brewing techniques. He lays a contemporary groundwork by compiling and analyzing the recipes of the National Homebrew Competition’s most successful beers. The assumption is that beers deemed representative of particular beer styles in modern competitions serve as ideal models for recipe creation. Among the information provided for each style is a chart showing the percentage of brewers using each type of grain and in what proportions the grains were added. Similar data are supplied for hop varieties, yeast strains, and water treatment. This reverse engineering of award-winning beers naturally benefits experienced brewers seeking to wow judges at the next competition. Yet, even brewers taking their first shy steps into creating their own recipes have much to gain from this kind of practical analysis. Daniels provides the basic tools a brewer of any level can use to formulate recipes with confidence and creativity. –Todd Gehman

Comments

Anonymous says:

It took me to the next level. I started brewing a couple years ago and knock out a brew every few months. I did extract once and then immediately to all grain and learned that process and I was wondering what next…I got this book and it sat around with a few glances for a bit and I finally got to reading it with a notepad. I appreciate it much more now. The chapters are short and too the point with about the first 3rd covering the technical basics of designing a beer. It doesn’t give you all the science…

Anonymous says:

I finally understand what this book is saying! I have been brewing for a couple years now, and I bought this book after my first two batches. At that time, I couldn’t understand much of what this book was trying to teach me, I wasn’t ready. Now, two years later and more batches of beer than I can count, I plucked this book from the shelf and everything has clicked. The language of Brewers is now something I understand, and I have a clear understanding of the brew process, so this book isn’t like reading a foreign language now. This book…

Anonymous says:

If you want to learn how to design great beers – buy this book. If you want a list of recipes, look elsewhere. Ray Daniels started home brewing in 1989, became a certified amateur beer judge in 1992, and won a beer writer of the year award in 1998. Daniels is the founder and director of the Cicerone Certification Program – a Sommelier program for beer servers. He is currently on the faculty of the Siebel Institute of Technology – a world class brewing school in Chicago founded in 1872. Daniels has authored over 2 dozen books. He wrote this book in 1996, published it in 1998 and copyrighted it again in…

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