Kolsch: History, Brewing Techniques, Recipes (Classic Beer Style Series)

October 28, 2016 - Comment

Kolsch: History, Brewing Techniques, Recipes (Classic Beer Style Series) Murder and Death, Cow Mouth, Gut Rot, Bitchy Maid―judging from the recipe names, the beer-drinking public of Cologne during the Middle Ages was a tough crowd. Home to this delicate golden ale, Cologne (Koln in German) enjoys one of the oldest brewing traditions around. List Price:

Kolsch: History, Brewing Techniques, Recipes (Classic Beer Style Series)

Kolsch: History, Brewing Techniques, Recipes (Classic Beer Style Series)

Murder and Death, Cow Mouth, Gut Rot, Bitchy Maid―judging from the recipe names, the beer-drinking public of Cologne during the Middle Ages was a tough crowd. Home to this delicate golden ale, Cologne (Koln in German) enjoys one of the oldest brewing traditions around.

List Price: $ 14.95

Price: $ 8.38

Comments

Switchblade McGillicutty says:
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars
The Kölsch Bible!, January 20, 2011
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This review is from: Kolsch: History, Brewing Techniques, Recipes (Classic Beer Style Series) (Paperback)
This is the book in English to own if you want to know more about Kölsch or want to brew your own Kölsch at home or commercially.

But the book isn’t perfect. More text (and photographs) could have been devoted to the unique style which Kölsch is served in Cologne, Germany.

Most articles do not stress enough the non-flocculating nature of authentic Kölsch yeasts (like WLP029, WY2575 (this is a new one) and WY2565 — my personal preference is 2565). To obtain an authentic Kölsch, you MUST filter your beer! Most homebrewers feel that filtering is evilness wrought from big, commercial breweries (and you need the proper equipment and time); but it is an absolute necessity for this style. BUT I don’t filter my Kölsch. Un-filtered Kölsch is properly referred to as a Wiess (sic) which is what I end up with. I guess someone could describe it as a Hefekölsch, but that term is not used. On the labels of unfiltered Kölsch in Germany, the word “Naturtrüb” is included on the label.

I would give this book 4.5 stars if I could.

Pros’t!

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Jc. says:
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars
Another great addition, August 9, 2011
By 
Jc. (Spring, Tx United States) –

Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
This review is from: Kolsch: History, Brewing Techniques, Recipes (Classic Beer Style Series) (Paperback)
If you are interested in the “Kolsh” style, I think this book is a great read. I would not get it if you are only looking for some recipes of Kolsh, there are not many to choose from in this book due to the style. With some of the other books in this series I had hoped for a few “clone” attempts, but with Kolsh, that is simply not necessary. Primary factors in brewing this style are temperature that you ferment and yeast contributions and characteristics.

This is a nice style beer to brew if you want to let people try a homebrew that would move them away from a commercial brewed brand without overwhelming them.

It is well written and not overly scientific.

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P. Mulloy says:
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars
Top Source on Kolsch, April 2, 2014
By 
P. Mulloy (Minneapolis, MN USA) –
(REAL NAME)
  

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This review is from: Kolsch: History, Brewing Techniques, Recipes (Classic Beer Style Series) (Paperback)
Author Eric Warner earned a degree in master brewing from Weihenstephan one of the oldest breweries in the world and also one of the best places in the world to learn about brewing German Beer. For the past 20 years he has been brewing German style beer professionally in Colorado. The author’s training and experience show throughout the book. He writes one of the best chapters on the history of the beer and how it came to be the Kolsch we know and love of any book in this series. His discussion of the sensory profile engages the avid drinker yet contains enough detail for the home brewer. He follows this with a chapter on brewing Kolsch that demonstrates his training and technical expertise. He follows up with an enjoyable chapter on enjoying Kolsch in Cologne, its native city. For the professional and home brewer he also provides recipes. Warner includes appendices on the breweries if Cologne and the city’s food. This is easy enough to follow for the average beer fan yet provides enough information for the professional brewer to tackle the style. His discussion of Cologne might warrant taking this book along on your next trip to Europe.
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