The Drunken Botanist: The Plants That Create the World's Great Drinks

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Every great drink starts with a plant. Sake began with a grain of rice. Scotch emerged from barley. Gin was born from a conifer shrub when medieval physicians boiled juniper berries with wine to treat stomach pain. The Drunken Botanist uncovers the surprising botanical history and fascinating science and chemistry of over 150 plants, flowers, trees, and fruits (and even a few fungi).

Beer Brewing Made Easy
Beer Brewing Made Easy
Beer Brewing Made Easy
Beer Brewing Made Easy
Beer Brewing Made Easy

Some of the most extraordinary and obscure plants have been fermented and distilled, and they each represent a unique cultural contribution to global drinking traditions and our history. Molasses was an essential ingredient of American independence when outrage over a mandate to buy British rather than French molasses for New World rum-making helped kindle the American Revolution. Captain James Cook harvested the young, green tips of spruce trees to make a vitamin C-rich beer that cured his crew of scurvy - a recipe that Jane Austen enjoyed so much that she used it as a plot point in Emma.

With over 50 drink recipes, growing tips for gardeners, and advice that carries Stewart's trademark wit, this is the perfect listen for gardeners and cocktail aficionados alike.

3 comments on “The Drunken Botanist: The Plants That Create the World's Great Drinks”

  1. My Kind of Trivia Lots and lots of minutiae to keep my grinning head spinning, and without the assistance of alcohol!A few very minor points though:Pg 73 "True yams are almost never sold in the U.S." No longer the case. Most ethnic groceries carry varieties of Dioscorea.Pg 89 "Some millets are called broom-corn; the broom shape is an apt descriptor." Think broom-corn is so called because it's used to make brooms, not because of its shape.Pg 120 Jackfruit. "When ripe, the fruit emits a...

  2. Fascinating Tour Intriguing read. I dabble a bit in making bitters, limoncello, and various types of meads and honey wines, and this book provided a fascinating tour of the history of alcohol, while introducing other intriguing social facts, like how slave trade grew to harvest sugar for rum; there's also some wonderful recipes, a fantastic discussion on what defines a top shelf alcohol, and even a history of a number of plants discussed. If you geek out on science or history, or just like booze, you'll...

  3. The book ties together two of my favorite things-- botany and alcohol As an author, I wish I had written this book. I can not imagine a more enjoyable topic to research! The book ties together two of my favorite things-- botany and alcohol. Packed with interesting facts about things I've been putting in my stomach for years that I never knew before. Joking aside, it also provides a foundation to think more about why we like certain tastes, why drinks taste as they do, and the many ways that plant diversity enriches our lives.

BeerBrewingSystems.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com
Beer Brewing Made Easy
Beer Brewing Made Easy
Beer Brewing Made Easy
Beer Brewing Made Easy
Beer Brewing Made Easy
Beer Brewing Made Easy
Beer Brewing Made Easy
Beer Brewing Made Easy
Beer Brewing Made Easy
Beer Brewing Made Easy
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